Category Archives: Education & Support

Blogs about what happens when a baby needs repair – to parents, the infant, and when the baby grows up. Some facts and feelings about the before, during and after of infant surgery.

Reflecting on my 70th

Birthdays and anniversaries are times for celebration, and reaching “three-score years and ten” years is certainly worth a big three cheers! But they are important for reflection as well.

150926-25 sml

Renmark Reunion September 2015

Gratitude to God and to the most important people in my life over these 70 years are features I’d like to be emblematic of me.  I am still surrounded with so many loving and kind people, I have enjoyed wonderful peace and excellent health, and my contribution in several circles is still wanted and apparently appreciated.

Ten days ago Helen and I gathered to celebrate my 70th birthday with our 4 children, their spouses and our 11 beautiful grandchildren.  A wonderful 5 days . . .

October 6th is ten days after my birth-day and  marks the 70th anniversary of the life-saving surgery I had in the Netherlands.  I would not be writing this but for that day in my life!

Together with the country of my birth and background, my weary and expecting parents were struggling to emerge from the ordeal of World War 2.  And then I arrived, their long-awaited first child, but soon clearly defective: scary, uncontrollable and life-endangering vomiting (infant pyloric stenosis – “PS”).  And these were times when medical science was pretty rough and ready by today’s standards and when people didn’t dwell on what they’d rather forget.

Pic 12

Mother with me – October 1945

So October 6th marks what I now realise was the gift of a new and wonderful second start in life, but also the beginning of a life-shaping journey of exploration and discovery – outside of me and within.

Outside, my parents were unwilling or unable to answer my reasonable questions about the 10 cm scar on my belly, and this drove me to look for information elsewhere.  But until the advent of the web, this search yielded only cold textbook medical data about PS and the then 33 year old surgical fix for the condition.  And explanations of my deeper issues were nowhere to be found: there were no pointers to where these might be unearthed and no ways of identifying people who could help me to realise (as I do now) that my pain was by no means wacky.

Book coverWithin, I was tormented with private pain from the dawn of my self-consciousness until recent years.  Even now I am still working to piece my private pain-puzzle together, although the web has given me access to much information, clarification and to networking with fellow-survivors, all of which has enabled me to receive and share much healing.  Since 2012 I have blogged about my journey, and in 2014 a pediatric surgeon friend and I published a small book, in which he explained what many still regard as the elusive cause of PS and I outlined my personal experience of this condition. It so happens (in Australia at least) that October 6 falls in “Mental Health Week” – and my own story has certainly helped me to feel a sense of identity with people challenged by mental health issues.

Time changes things!  The past 70 years have taught us the value of openness in the home, the importance of both listening and speaking for healing, of collaboration in achieving goals, and (by no means least) we have learnt much about trauma.

70 years have also brought huge changes to surgical technique and to holistic care in the hospital and home.  Time seems to have done less to change the unhelpful attitudes of some in the medical profession – but that’s due to human nature being far from perfect.

What do these changes (and their lack in some respects) mean?

120327-07-WgHcThe kind of trauma symptoms I struggled with is rare among more recent PS survivors.  Their surgical scars are sometimes almost indiscernible, usually tidy and very rarely as gnarly.  Affected children’s and their parents’ questions are typically answered much more fully and sympathetically, and the children are helped to understand, “own” and even feel pride about their story.

As I see it, I have discerned this is the growth in myself.  I am indeed a survivor from a bygone era of medical practice and parenting, and my scar is an exhibit of mid-20th century surgery.  I know it’s not socially correct for a cultured older gentleman like me to proudly show off his scar as an 8 year old lad might… but I’m catching up on lost joys and enjoying it!

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Is there a link between infant PS and later abdominal trouble?

Most General Practitioners (GPs) will reject any link out of hand.  Some GPs have even been known to ask their patient (or client) what “PS” (pyloric stenosis) is.

We can be sure that every medical textbook and training includes at least a page or part of a lecture on PS, which is the most common reason for non-elective surgery on infants in their first months and years.  But who can blame a medical student for not remembering everything they are told and read over six or more packed years?

However, the almost universal denial of a link between PS and later abdominal trouble is more than a nuisance.  It may be “textbook” but it misleads and misinforms the parents of a PS baby and most will continue with this false assurance until they discover the truth – usually only after much frustration.  As for PS survivors, they are the immediate and personal subjects of the widespread ignorance and misinformation about the possible long-term gastric and other problems that can come with PS and/or its surgery.

113This kind of trouble does not seem to afflict the majority of PS survivors, and may only affect a small minority.  But considering PS affects between 2 and 5 in every 1,000 babies, that is still a lot of people!  I have on file hundreds of stories just from those who have told something of their story on Facebook’s several PS Group pages – and elsewhere!  There are several other social forum sites carrying the stories of worried or unhappy PSers.

The pattern is typically like this:

  • The “survivors” endure some years of increasingly nagging (though not mortal) discomfort, pain and frustration with real but unidentified gastric and/or other abdominal symptoms (tightness, pain, bloating, irritable bowels, dietary misbehaviour, vomiting, etc.
  • Their doctors seem loathe to acknowledge these symptoms, giving their patients medication or dietary advice.
  • There is outright rejection of PS possibly having long-term consequences – the high acidity of PS, damage to the gastric passage and even the lungs (from ingested vomit), post-surgical adhesions, and trauma after old-style infant surgery and hospitalization are just some of the hazards which should be considered.  All of these possible conditions have been documented and reported in medical literature.
  • It seems that often the “survivor” discovers the link between their malady and their PS past only when they stumble onto an online forum where they find they are not alone.

Sadly, because PS-related problems are low on the medical world’s radar for several reasons, there is virtually no interest in researching them.  Hence the medical juggernaut rolls on in rejection and ignorance.  However, there have been a few small studies and (from what I have found) just one very large study that have confirmed that infant PS is not always free of long-term consequences.

If the reader is interested to trawl through enough pages of stories on this blog and on the screens of the largest three of Facebook’s PS Groups, they will also find reports that several GI specialists have (usually after many, many consultations) admitted to a connection, agreed on tests, and arrived at better advice treatment.

In 2014 a pediatric surgeon friend and I published a small book, in which he explained what many still regard as the elusive cause of PS and I outlined my personal experience of this condition.

Pain01Lay reading of medical journals and even a basic understanding of how our gut and PS work tell us there certainly can be a link.  More specifically, the high acid that causes PS continues with the patient, raising the risk of related issues including reflux, irritable bowels, esophageal damage, and gastric ulcers and cancer.  Reduced gastric emptying could well be caused by damage to the vagus nerve or adhesions from the operation constricting the working of the stomach and gall bladder, whilst the throat / voice problems are likely caused by erosion / scarring of the esophagus caused by reflux, high acid, or lack of care with the breathing tube during surgery.

Of course anyone with any such symptoms would need a proper diagnosis but it’s not hard for even lay people to understand the links.  With countless numbers from my Facebook networks, I plead with the medical profession, parents, patients and the family and friends of PS survivors to recognise and help spread the awareness of this quite common condition and its possible ramifications.

And if what you the reader has learnt here “rings a bell” … I sincerely hope that you have been greatly encouraged to pursue your problem and get it sorted out.

Aware parenting after infant surgery

At the age of just 3 years, children learn to use the word “Why?”

We humans are incurably curious, we want to understand what we see and hear.

Read this recent social media post by the mother of a pyloric stenosis child –

mum-dtr talk1My son was almost 9 weeks when he had his surgery.  It took them a long time to diagnose him; he will be 6 years old in a few weeks and his scar is about 3″ long.  He’s grown over the summer and has complained a lot about his tummy hurting.  That was part of the reason I joined the group so I could find out if other PS children experienced the same thing.  He also had a hernia repaired when he was 14 months old.  The scar bothers him when he gets asked what happened, but I tell him you were really sick and needed an operation to make you better.  Mommy loves your scar.  Then he smiles and laughs and forgets about the questions.

I wonder, what is your response to this post?  “What a lovely Mommy”?  “How nice”?

This was my response to this mother –

That interaction between you and your son reminds me so much of when I was his age!

My mother and I would have times like that, and my mum would use those exact same words.  But I never could never smile and forget to ask any more questions.  And when I asked more questions, the response was always, “We’ll talk about that sometime later” – but we never did.

150414-085And so from age 5 I increasingly felt embarrassed about the scar running down the middle of my belly, and whenever I asked the questions I had I felt fobbed off by pleasantries.  This deepened a then already real phobia that would trouble me for many years.

Today we know so much more and so I’m sure you’ll be sensitive to your son’s deeper personal feelings and be able to help him.  I still wish now that my mum (long passed on) had taken the initiative several times over my growing years –
1) showing she recognised my struggle instead of telling me off for showing any sign of it,
2) telling me about her part in and feelings about my first op in detail,
3) answering any questions I still had, and
4) discussing with me how I could work on my phobia.

Your son may grow up being very different from me, of course, but believe me, I’m far from alone in what I’ve just posted here!

Pyloric stenosis surgery – “somewhat improved”

Has the treatment of infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”) improved with the years?

Yes!  In a recent post I listed many of the clear and obvious ways it has.

Adults struggling with IBS, adhesions, or PTSD may well doubt that; any and all of these can at times be linked with their infant surgery.

The mother I read about recently must surely also doubt that much has been learnt: she was diagnosed with PTSD a few months after suffering with her newborn through several weeks of slow and shoddy diagnosis followed by “last minute, life-saving” PS surgery.

And the continuing avalanche of parents’ posts on social forum sites like Facebook and BabyCenter show this hapless mother is far from alone.

However, what I wrote in the above-mentioned post stands: it is beyond doubt that, thank God and thanks to the medical community, infant surgery including the treatment of PS has made huge progress.

Infant surgery03Last year I read the summary of a 2014 report that supports the claim that the actual surgery to remedy PS has also improved – but only marginally.  The survey evaluates the records of 791 little PS patients of a pediatric surgeon over a 35 year period (1969-2003).

Most of the results reported in the Abstract of this article (sadly, all that is publicly available) merely confirm the usual facts about PS, information that will not surprise those who know something about this condition.

  • 82% of the patients were male and 18% were female.
  • The average age (presumably at surgery) was 38 days and ranged from 7 days to 10 months.
  • Only 5% were not Caucasian.
  • 10% had a family history.
  • 15 babies (3.1%) were premature at the time of diagnosis (so in fact, many more).
  • 9% had other conditions or abnormalities.
  • 10 babies (1.2%) developed PS after surgery for another condition.
  • 13 (1.7%) were treated medically and avoided surgery.
  • All the pyloromyotomy operations were done by open surgery: the incisions used were sub-costal, transverse, or upper midline.
  • 14 babies (1.7%) had other surgical work done (presumably including herniation).
  • 87 of the operations (10%) were followed by complications: 1.1% happened during the surgery, and 9% post-operatively.
  • 2 babies died.
  • Other evaluation results showed some areas of improvement.
  • When ultrasound imaging was used, the age at diagnosis was reduced by about 10 days.
  • All the operations were done using general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation (breathing tube).
  • From 1982, precautionary antibiotics were given before surgery and this resulted in wound infections being reduced to 3.9%.

This surgeon was also responsible for correcting the inadequacy of the work of some non-pediatric surgeons, and these statistics make grim reading:

  • There were 13 such little patients, 12 of them transferred from non-pediatric surgeons.
  • These 13 accounted for 16 complications including one death.
  • 5 of the babies needed further surgery: 4 for an incomplete pyloromyotomy and the other for a perforation of the pyloric canal.

The report drew these conclusions:

  • IHPS should be considered in any vomiting infant.
  • Ultrasound examination allows earlier diagnosis.
  • Serious complications are uncommon and avoidable, but recognizable and easily corrected.
  • Surgeons who do more than 14 pyloromyotomies per annum see fewer complications.

This report (as stated above) deals only with the actual surgical treatment of PS, and not the complaints of many about the total management of this condition.  The report featured does not survey the standard of the diagnosis of PS, nor the often uninformed, sweeping, and simplistic reassurances given about the possible short- and long-term after-effects of PS and its surgical treatment, about which so many doctors and parents seem to be quite “in the dark” (or possibly in denial).

RUQ PLM-3This blogsite and the social media posts of countless parents and patients express gratitude for the survival of almost every PS baby, ever since the Ramstedt pyloromyotomy (surgical operation) rapidly became the standard treatment after 1912.

It is often remarked that the Ramstedt pyloromyotomy is one of the few surgical techniques that has continued as the standard and virtually unchanged since it was introduced.  It is relatively quick and simple to perform, and almost always immediately effective (as much as can be expected of any surgical procedure).

What the report implies but fails to acknowledge is that many older surgeons continue to perform Ramstedt’s pyloromyotomy using the old and often disfiguring open incisions.  Other recent statistics show that the new and cosmetically superior laparoscopic surgery is now used in over half of PS operations.  Understandably but sadly, many older surgeons resist mastering current best practice.

What then is clear from the material collected and reviewed in the two posts (this one and the linked post)?

  • The overall management of PS has seen huge progress.
  • The actual surgery for PS has changed little in a century, but continues to be marginally and slowly improved on.
  • There remain several areas of immediate and significant concern to PS patients and their parents which the medical community is loathe to recognise, let alone seriously tackle.

And therefore numerous PS parents and patients will continue to speak up, network – and post!

Pyloric stenosis and training better doctors

Some of the things people do are utterly unbelievable, were it not for the fact that we humans all do so many things that range from dim-witted to diabolical.

Ostrich_head_in_sandAustralia is more affected by growing extremes of fire and flood, and yet we have a government that rejects the diagnosis and advice of 95% of the world’s scientists on climate change.

My experience of the long-term effects of a life-threatening stomach blockage which I suffered as a baby (pyloric stenosis or “PS”) has moved me to learn more about it and to publicise what I and countless others are discovering via this blog and on Facebook.

Now consider this: the medical world has finally recognised that someone with academic brilliance does not necessarily become the kind of doctor you and I would like to consult, so for more than 20 years now university medical schools have been adding a personal interview and assessment to their entrance requirements.

Imagine my utter disgust when I recently read that one of Australia’s premier universities decided to turn the clock back and scrap these character and skill assessments from the enrolment procedure!  Admittedly this university is in what is widely regarded as the country’s most uninformed and regressive State.

arrogant doc4The writer told me that “ . . . the University of Queensland had dumped its medical interview altogether, saying that it does not add value beyond academic results and was a poor predictor of academic performance.  Medical schools guard their decisions like state secrets so I am not privy to their data but the report did get me thinking about the kind of doctors we want to create and how we go about selecting them.”

One of the most common and upsetting experiences new parents can have with a “PS” baby relates to the doctors responsible for the initial assessment and care of their little one.  True, some parents go online to thank and praise their doctor and hospital staff, and it may well be that there is a silent majority of parents who don’t comment publicly on their experience.

What is it then about doctors and hospital Emergency Departments that causes so many parents to complain?  In brief, professional ignorance and personal incompetence.

Professional ignorance

Infant Pyloric Stenosis is the most common condition requiring infant surgery – at least in the prevailing awareness of the medical community in most developed countries.  It occurs between 2 and 5 times in every 1000 births.  In other words, not every family includes a PS survivor, but everyone of us knows several people who happen to have had PS!  I personally know more than half a dozen PSers (apart from the hundreds with whom I have networked online).

Professional ignorance 1Yet many parents find their doctor unaware of even the basics of PS which they have picked up from Dr Google or from their family health book.  Parents often complain that their doctor told them that their baby could not have PS if it is female, only a few days old, or not first-born.  Doctors routinely show disdain for parents’ reports of the simple signs of PS, like projectile vomits, significant weight loss, loss of soiled and wet diapers/nappies, abdominal muscles swelling and rippling after feeding and before vomiting, and a history of PS in the family.

Yes, it is true that “all babies sick up” and that serious vomiting can be caused by any of a number of serious as well as routine conditions.  It is also true that PS appears in a variety of ways: the majority of cases (but far from all) appear at between 3 weeks and 3 months old, sometimes PS becomes life threatening within days, and other times it develops for several weeks before it can be well diagnosed.  I was operated on when only 10 days old, and some PSers have reported on Facebook having surgery only days, others at 6 or 7 months after their birth.

However, what really upsets parents is that the above symptoms and facts are so often dismissed, that pleas for diagnostic tests are ignored and that often no attempt is made in the clinic to assess the obviously available symptoms – until the baby’s condition is critical and the parents are desperate.  So many parents are on record as being told (as if they were guilty of some misdeed) that “your baby nearly died before we were able to operate” or “this was the most advanced PS we have seen for a long time”.

Another area of professional ignorance that upsets many parents and survivors is the medical world’s apparently utter ignorance of or denial that PS and its surgery can have both short-term and lasting consequences.  I have posted many times about this and plan to continue to do this.

Personal incompetence

The linked article above relates more directly to the difficulties caused by doctors who lack personal sensitivity, the ability to empathise, show common decency, and have clear ethical values and conflict resolution skills – what we’d surely like to think are basics but are far from generally held.

frustrated01This post will not catalogue the complaints of parents and survivors in this regard, as I have written several posts sampling these; they also come in droves on several online forum sites and are sprinkled through the results of any targeted web search.

It both grieves and angers me that the medical profession is in some part still so unaware of or careless about the distress it can quite unnecessarily and avoidably add to the ordeal that new parents suffer when their newborn becomes seriously ill.

We live in times when many community work personnel and organisations, from social workers and teachers to banks, schools and churches, are being held to account for their laxity and negligence.

Unlike these bodies and professions, the medical world is still held in quite high regard by the general community.  Being the monitors and dispensers of physical life and death and having among the best minds and nest-eggs in the land certainly bring fear and power!  And let’s be fair, like people in every other part of society, many (and I trust most) doctors work hard, selflessly and competently.

However, much of the medical world is all-too-apparently addicted to power of various kinds.  This is why entrance interviews must be valued and maintained as much as entrance scores.

This surely is not a matter of “either … or” but “both … and”.

Pyloric stenosis: dealing with doctors who delay

Doctors working in a hospital or private practice should be aware of the symptoms and other characteristics of infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”).

M820/0092Sadly, many are not.  Just go online and read the horrible stories of hundreds of new parents.  Forum sites like Facebook and BabyCentre (in North America, BabyCenter) include a sorry litany of lamentations and “lip” about ignorant doctors, simplistic notions about the causes of a blocked stomach in a baby, and lack of knowledge of the basic signs of PS, not to mention the autocratic attitude of many of these doctors, all delaying a prompt and life-saving diagnosis and treatment process even further.

Yet PS is the most common reason for infant surgery that is “non-elective” – in other words, unavoidable to save a baby’s life.  And if PS is discovered soon enough and the baby is older than one month, non-surgical treatment is an option (although not often considered) that may save a mountain of trouble in later life.

Parents deserve much better than a medical professional roadblocking diagnosis and treatment: an uncontrollably sick newborn is stressful enough without being repeatedly fobbed off or put down by your doctor.

My holiday reading this month (in a balmy Aussie summer) turned up two telling internet articles that link with the above.

The first was from a British doctor who reflected on the challenges of working in a hospital emergency department (“ED”, or accident and emergency section).  He complains about the impossible hours these doctors work, to us “ordinary people” an unfathomable mystery that has been widely known for many years – and still seems to be beyond the combined skills of the most intelligent, educated and prestigious members of our community to address.

Scared_DoctorWhat this doctor also detailed was that so often ED doctors and staff have to work with the saddest and most damaged and dysfunctional people in our cities and towns: substance abusers, people without the ability or willingness to treat others with kindness and respect, and of course, the many people who have suffered the consequences of these ugly symptoms of a broken world.

Reading this doctor’s account brought home to me (yet again) that there is another side to the litany of parent complaints I mentioned above: many doctors are stressed out by Western society’s unwillingness to pay ever more for health care, by their profession’s inability to address the totally unreasonable workload of “juniors”, and by the continuing and deepening breakdown of society.

The parents of a sick baby are often the “collateral damage” of this.  Little do most of us know or care what may cause a doctor to be aloof, dismissive, or arrogant?  The parents themselves are usually too tense and preoccupied with their sick baby to consider “the big picture”.

What can the parents of a sick child do when they are faced with a doctor who upsets them even further?  Here are some suggestions:

  1. blog-writing1Make notes of your baby’s story: keep a full and detailed record of its weight, feeding intake and times, its output (both top and bottom), its general wellness and appearance, and anything else you notice.  This will enable you to give the doctor or ED staff clear facts.  It’s much harder to brush these aside.
  2. Do your homework and learn what you can from books and/or the web about your baby’s symptoms.  Stomach or feeding problems can be caused by quite a list of different medical problem conditions, and each comes with different symptoms and needs different tests to help guide diagnosis.  Many doctors will not spend precious time or order costly tests to search for or nail down a diagnosis unless there are already clear signs pointing to it, or (and this is sad but understandable) unless it becomes clear that the baby’s life is in danger (e. g. as shown by steady weight loss or dehydration).
    Sadly, if this happens, the baby may already have suffered effects on its brain development.  Parents should do what they can to make it easy for their doctor to steer a diagnosis in the right direction.
  3. writer-thumbA doctor is trained and likes to work as a scientist: they have to gather the evidence and work methodically towards a conclusion.  This means eliminating possible causes.  Allow the doctor to be the scientist and stay in the driver’s seat.  Hold yourself back from telling the doctor what you think or have already decided what the problem is, but be informed and alert enough not to let the doctor fob you off or delay a decision if the symptoms you have listed clearly point to a particular problem.
    The need for all this advice is abundantly clear.  there are countless reports of doctors ruling out PS “because your baby is a girl” or “because your baby is not your first-born”.  Other common reports are of doctors refusing to even consider testing for PS even though there are clear symptoms and one (or even both) parents had it and the condition is common among the baby’s relatives!
  4. Patient & doctor03Be firm and insistent about what you expect but stay calm, respectful and reasonable – hard as this may sometimes be.  Most of us do not handle hostility, abuse, and unreasonableness well!  Doctors are no exception.  Mind you, it seems that not a few doctors invite anger and harsh language by their lack of medical competence and/or people skills.
    If you know you risk “losing it” in some way or other over a sick infant, it would be wise to take a close, supportive and mature family member or friend along.  Some people I have advised online have (I believe) not helped their baby’s cause by their own behaviour.

My next post will look at the second article – about the selection and training of doctors.

Are Pyloric Stenosis problems history yet?

In my previous post I explored the horrible old mantra that “babies have no brain and therefore will not feel or remember pain”.

When I was just 10 days old I had my first surgical operation, for a pyloric stenosis (“PS”, a blockage at the stomach’s outlet) which occurs fairly commonly in between 2 and 5 baby boys and about one girl in every 1,000.  In 1945 (and for several decades after this) the trauma easily caused by what is today regarded as simple surgery was not understood –

  • the operation was often done without a general anesthetic, sometimes even without local pain control because of the major hazards and possible side-effects of each;
  • hospital stays after such an operation were routinely 2 weeks;
  • in hospital sick and recovering babies were routinely separated from their mother to reduce the danger of infection and they were fed on bottled milk;
  • the effects of these practices on the infant’s parents were usually discounted and masked by a code of silence, which often made them even more toxic in the long-term on parent and patient.
  • What I have outlined here has had a lifelong effect on me, and most likely also my parents, although they maintained their silence to their deaths many years ago.

Nerdy MD2One effect of this on me has been a lifelong and obsessive interest in PS and infant surgery.  In recent years what I have learnt and continue to learn has been channelled into teaching and advocacy for the a list of “issues” around these two subjects –

  • What is PS and how was it treated yesterday and is it treated today?
  • Can surgery for infant PS be avoided?
  • How can PS and its surgery affect the infant’s parents?
  • How can they affect the patient in the immediate and long-term?
  • Why is the diagnosis of PS often so frustratingly delayed and what can be done about this?
  • How can parents deal with the problems babies frequently have after the operation?
  • How can PS survivors deal with some remarkably similar problems that all-too-often arise in adult life?
  • Do babies feel and remember pain and other trauma of their pre-verbal stage of life?
  • What are the symptoms of PTSD that seem linked to early infant surgery, and what therapies and programs are available to those affected?
  • Since gaining access to the internet in 1997, I have learnt much about all the “issues” listed, from websites, blogs, social forums, and some valuable personal interactions and friendships that have resulted.

In 2015 I plan to continue sharing and interacting with the PS community via this blog, as well as on several social forums, notably the various Facebook Groups committed to offering support, sharing information and raising awareness about PS.

SeatonHarlan age 4 Fb 140502-2PS survivors and their parents on Facebook sometimes express their profound gratitude that some of the issues I have listed above are now largely becoming consigned to the historical record.

Greatly improved support for parents, good pain management, new surgical techniques that much reduce disfigurement, and short hospital stays are now standard.  Parents may also remark that there seems to be a slowly growing change in the medical professions’ awareness of PS and their attitude to PS parents: less professional paternalism, arrogance and conceit.  Changing social attitudes and better education in medical school seems to be germane to this.

However, it is also quite clear that we are far from being able to “move on” and go fishing!