Tag Archives: support

Pyloric stenosis: treasure and then trauma

How could the birth of a new life, the time of life’s greatest possible personal triumph, also come to be remembered as the greatest trauma that the same person has ever endured?

baby worriesThe birth and unexpected death of a child must surely be the most poignant possible example of that.

A close second must be the birth of a child who is damaged or imperfect in some other way. But it is surely beyond belief that the tragedy of finding that this brand new gift is damaged is sometimes made unimaginably deeper when the people we look to for advice and help are unsympathetic and dismissive of our concern and pain.

Surviving infant surgery (the theme of this blog) sometimes means for new parents, “surviving the hard and closed minds of the medical world”.

There are several Facebook Groups that offer support to those affected by infant surgery, especially infant pyloric stenosis.  PS is the condition responsible for the highest number of life-saving surgeries (operations) on babies. The great majority of “threads” (complaints, discussions and advice) on these Facebook sites relate to the unnecessarily long weeks before diagnosis, and to being treated very poorly by doctors.

Several mothers have posted about their unexpected and deeply frustrating experiences on their blog.  Jenn Cahill is a British mother whose traumatic experience in getting recognition and treatment for her son’s PS helped her to start blogging about this and other challenges of pregnancy and new motherhood.

girl-w-laptop01In a recent post, Pyloric stenosis, Jenn put on record her mother’s battle to have her (Jenn’s) PS taken seriously back in 1993, only to happen again a generation later!  Jenn post chronicles the almost unbelievable story of her 2-3 week struggle in 2015 with dismissive medical staff before her son’s PS was taken seriously; by then his vital signs had deteriorated to the extent that it took several days to resuscitate him enough to withstand a relatively simple surgical procedure.

At the same time as she posted her story (early February 2016), Jenn participated in a spirited discussion of this issue on Facebook’s Pyloric Stenosis Support Group.  (Note: this is one of several “closed Groups” dealing with issues around PS, “closed” meaning that Facebook subscribers can find each Group but not read and add their own material unless they join that Group.)

Here is the opening story to a P S Support Group thread – from a US mother, posted on 29 January 2016 –

Hello all, my son and I were struggling with feeding issues/lack of supply, so I had him checked for tongue tie.  As it turned out, he did have posterior tongue tie, and he had his frenulum snipped at 2 weeks.  His first feeding afterward, he threw up a large volume within minutes of each other.  I called our ped in a panic and was told he overfed as he was finally able to suck effectively.
This began 7 weeks of misdiagnosis hell.  He continued to throw up 1-5 times a day.  Our ped diagnosed him with reflux.  We tried different formulas, and he was put on prevacid.  His vomiting wasn’t projectile, but forceful and huge in volume.  The worst was when he was on enfamil AR – the formula was so thick that it was extremely difficult and painful when he vomited.  I was so scared watching him during these episodes.  We were at the ped nearly every day, getting nowhere.
Vomiting continued, and he was barely gaining weight.  We went to a GI specialist at 4.5 weeks.  At our first appointment, I asked if he could have PS and if we should do an ultrasound.  My concerns were brushed off.  The specialist diagnosed him with a milk protein allergy in addition to reflux – told me this was all normal baby stuff.  My son’s health continued to decline.  For an entire MONTH, we saw this doctor.  I asked at every appointment if he had PS, shouldn’t we do an ultrasound.  I was refused every time.  Finally, at our last appointment I demanded one, which confirmed my son DID IN FACT have a severe case of PS.  She fought his diagnosis all day, ordering the barium swallow test and ANOTHER ultrasound.  Both of which confirmed PS.  He had surgery the next day, after being hooked up to iv’s for 24 hours as he was extremely dehydrated.
He is now 7 months, thriving, healthy, so happy and sweet.  Yet, I can’t get over what we went through.  I can’t forget the pain and stress of it all… can’t stop punishing myself with the what ifs.  I thought I was progressing, but today I had to write a letter of hardship as we’re applying for financial assistance with his many overwhelming medical bills.  I had a total meltdown reliving that time.
Sorry for the long post.  Just looking for support from PS parents.  He is my first baby.

In a later frustrated response –

Made me question my instincts over and over.  Made me feel like an utter failure as a mother.  All the while my son’s health deteriorated with no end in sight.  I’m so glad I finally demanded that ultrasound that day… I can’t imagine how much longer he would have suffered or what would have happened to him.

Another new mother added –

Funny you should post this as I’m up at 3 am reliving our 9 weeks of hell with exactly the same story as yours.  The guilt and anger consume me at these times of night so I decided tonight that I am over the weekend going to make a formal complaint to the hospital as I want to ensure an investigation takes place so it doesn’t happen to someone else as new parents with a very ill newborn.
All I think we can do is console ourselves that we trusted our instincts eventually and we put our trust in the professionals which we should, but unfortunately their duty of care was sub-standard.
I’m glad your little one is now thriving, my little boy is also 7 months and doing really well but it has traumatised me and although it’s faded and I’m sure will more with time, I think these experiences will last with us for a long time.

And another mother wrote –

Thank you for reaching out to me – I’m sorry you also went through this.  It’s so awful.  I swear, I have PTSD.  I suffered major anxiety/panic attacks the first month or so afterward.  I felt okay for a bit, like I’d processed things and then out of nowhere, I’ll have a bad day like today.  It’s also hard not to worry that every little thing is a result of the many weeks of unnecessary vomiting or fear for future health issues.  I filed a complaint against the doctors with the Medical Board… who knows if they will be reprimanded, but at least I tried.  And, wrote scathing yelp and google reviews.  It’s sickening how negligent medical care can be.
Can we keep in touch if we ever need to talk or are having a rough day?  I don’t feel like any family or friends can truly grasp how I feel or what we went through.  The worst is the “just be thankful he’s healthy and thriving now.”  As if I’m not or I don’t know that…

And she added –

Ugh, don’t get me started on insurance.  I feel I’ve wasted half my son’s life on the phone dealing with them.  Pretty much every single nap until the last couple weeks.

And another mother’s story in brief –

My story is exactly the same as yours except I was told reflux by 8 different doctors.  And just treated like an “over anxious new mum”, told to go get some rest!  Had to film my baby having a seizure which he would have every night from the pain and the choking before I could get just one doctor to listen!  I’m still so angry.

There were many more contributions than those included here.  I end this selection with another of Jenn Cahill’s responses –

Had exactly the same story as you with the main difference being I had PS as a newborn!!!  And they still refused to diagnose him despite it being a much stronger risk if your mother has previously had it.  Absolutely ridiculous.
I struggle to have faith in Doctors now as I think they’re trying to just brush me off as a silly mother as they did when he was tiny.
He’s 6 months now and yet I still panic if he throws up a large amount.  And I’m terrified for the future as we are planning a second and I’m so scared we are going to go through it all again.

It needs to be added here that –

  • Scared_Doctordoctors are known to be busy and work long hours, usually covering a wide range of health issues: hardly a situation conducive to a sensitive listening ear;
  • many infant conditions are no doubt recognised quickly and dealt with well;
  • several of the symptoms of PS are not unique to this condition, nor does PS always present the same way:  correct diagnosis is of course essential and often takes some time; and
  • despite doctors being as imperfect as ourselves, the death rate from infant PS has fallen from the majority a century ago to very low today (less than 1%).

Nevertheless, the medical world has some well-recognised problems, including some practitioners having a serious attitude problem and the number and nature of complaints about the way people are dealt with at what should be one of the most beautifully memorable times of their lives.

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Coming out – about our scars after infant surgery

Many of us feel most comfortable conforming, not drawing attention to ourselves.  Many others pride themselves in being different, “standing out from the pack”.  I envy them!

I very much belong to the first lot: I totally hated my 9 cm (3½”) scar from a pyloric stenosis operation back in 1945 when I was just 10 days old.  My scar shame was quite apart from the symptoms of post-traumatic stress which (as far as I can discover) resulted from the story of my first illness.

This deeply felt sensitivity about my scar was probably not unconnected with the psychological effects on me of the surgery, but it mushroomed when I became conscious of wearing a scar that is “front and centre” and very obvious in the bath and at the beach.  Asking my parents about it clearly unsettled them, further intensifying my own discomfort.

The internet has shown me that my obsessive sense of shame is far from universal among those who have needed infant surgery, and that many flaunt their scar with pride and think up fantastic stories about having been stabbed, or attacked by a shark.

But I have also been greatly comforted to learn that many have felt as I did:  my emotions and inner pain are hardly freakish or unique.

yay1One of the things that has helped me to find peace with myself is the number of people who have used the web to share their own struggle towards the self-acceptance of their disability or disfigurement.  Often their life was much more difficult and their blemish more severe than mine

I have also joined the many who have also gone online to “objectify” their scar: to post a photo of it or of them wearing it in public, empowering us to break through what is very much a self-imposed complex and to see ourselves as others do.

Again and again the posts and comments on social networking sites like Facebook express gratitude at the opportunity to network and share something that in the past was all too often a lonely and endless ache.

For those interested, here are some links to blogs that others and I have found liberating –

Angella Dykstra – Scarred for life

David Fetterman’s story about Father and son

Maggie Van Buskirk’s story

Nathan Long – Forced to fast for peace

Enjoy!  Grow!  Share!

Aware parenting after infant surgery

At the age of just 3 years, children learn to use the word “Why?”

We humans are incurably curious, we want to understand what we see and hear.

Read this recent social media post by the mother of a pyloric stenosis child –

mum-dtr talk1My son was almost 9 weeks when he had his surgery.  It took them a long time to diagnose him; he will be 6 years old in a few weeks and his scar is about 3″ long.  He’s grown over the summer and has complained a lot about his tummy hurting.  That was part of the reason I joined the group so I could find out if other PS children experienced the same thing.  He also had a hernia repaired when he was 14 months old.  The scar bothers him when he gets asked what happened, but I tell him you were really sick and needed an operation to make you better.  Mommy loves your scar.  Then he smiles and laughs and forgets about the questions.

I wonder, what is your response to this post?  “What a lovely Mommy”?  “How nice”?

This was my response to this mother –

That interaction between you and your son reminds me so much of when I was his age!

My mother and I would have times like that, and my mum would use those exact same words.  But I never could never smile and forget to ask any more questions.  And when I asked more questions, the response was always, “We’ll talk about that sometime later” – but we never did.

150414-085And so from age 5 I increasingly felt embarrassed about the scar running down the middle of my belly, and whenever I asked the questions I had I felt fobbed off by pleasantries.  This deepened a then already real phobia that would trouble me for many years.

Today we know so much more and so I’m sure you’ll be sensitive to your son’s deeper personal feelings and be able to help him.  I still wish now that my mum (long passed on) had taken the initiative several times over my growing years –
1) showing she recognised my struggle instead of telling me off for showing any sign of it,
2) telling me about her part in and feelings about my first op in detail,
3) answering any questions I still had, and
4) discussing with me how I could work on my phobia.

Your son may grow up being very different from me, of course, but believe me, I’m far from alone in what I’ve just posted here!

Networking about infant pyloric stenosis (1): links

For those who have had surgery for infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”) the online social media and discussion forums have been a Godsend.

Being a 1945 PS baby, for most of my life I was able to compare notes with only a very few others who share my PS-related joys and sorrows.  But worldwide networking has arrived and flourished since the advent of the internet in the 1990s.

Parents now compare notes on their baby’s PS, the surgery, and what followed.  Many regard it as the most traumatic experience they’ve ever had, too often made worse by the lack of awareness, sloppy diagnostic work, and even arrogance of their doctor.  Many tell their tale or join a Facebook Group hoping to increase the general awareness of PS, the most common condition of infancy which is usually dealt with surgically.

blog-writing1Survivors are typically keen to break out of their sense of aloneness.  We can now compare our feelings over the surgery and scar: we had no say and have no memory of our first crisis, but we can now meet others with the gnarly or deeply sunken scar which most of us hated, especially in our earlier years.

Many PS survivors also want to learn about a list of ongoing problems which some have and which seem to be related to their stomach operation, although doctors don’t agree or want to know about this.  After all, the paediatrician and the surgeon assured our parents that the operation was easy, quick, almost always immediately successful, and that there are no long-term problems after PS and the surgery.  “If only!”

Facebook is the most accessible and popular address and has at least six large and small PS Groups and they are actively used by both parents and PSers.  Unlike web forum sites, Facebook Groups can only be accessed by registered users; they just need to type “pyloric stenosis” into the Search box to get a list of Groups.

Forum sites like Experience Project, MedHelp, Patient UK, and Topix each have one or more discussion groups for PSers.  These four links are to each site’s most popular discussion on PS matters, and a search there will usually give you links to other discussions on that site.

Expectant and recent mothers share their experiences, concerns and questions on specialist sites including BabyCenter (in the USA), BabyCentre (in the UK), and also in other countries.

Readers interested in any of the PS-related issues are to be encouraged to “visit” some of these online locations.  Consider sharing your story and help increase the public and medical world’s rather too common ignorance of PS!

In the next few posts I want to pass on some samples of the important information that is shared on the pages of some of Facebook’s PS Groups.

Pyloric stenosis: a mother’s story

In mid-2013 an Australian mother posted a story and some photos of her son for his 8th birthday – with his permission.  She wrote –

I am more than happy for you to use his photo and story to help raise awareness of infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”) in any way you feel will help.  …  I hope it can help others.

What this mother writes is typical of the experience of countless numbers of parents, something this blogsite has often raised and must surely challenge all providers of medical care.  Here is this mother’s story, edited slightly to form one account from her correspondence with me…

SL 2005-13My little fighter: this is my son exactly 8 years since he got out of hospital from his operation.  He was 5 weeks old when he had it done.

Getting a diagnosis

We had had two weeks of hell: my son actually stopped breathing because he was throwing up so much.  I was lucky I reacted quickly when he stopped breathing, perhaps others don’t.  Mind you, the clean up afterwards was awful, he had power chucked across the lounge room, covering everything.  He doesn’t do things by halves, that’s for sure.  That was his worst: most vomits were just 1-2 meters, still awful to deal with.  But once he was breathing we were in the car and on the way to hospital.

We live in a small industrial city of about 22,000 in Australia, and I had taken him to 4 – 5 doctors and to the hospital at home 3 times for his vomiting, and I got told the usual stuff: reflux, etc, even that I was an over-anxious young mum (I was 22, most people here are parents by the time they are 18-19) – and this was after he’d stopped breathing on me.  Unfortunately it seems most doctors either don’t know about PS or don’t want to even suggest it as a possibility.

So we made a call to the hospital in the next town over (45 minutes away) and a night nurse basically diagnosed him over the phone.  It was a huge relief to have a nurse not far away tell us what it probably was.

So it had time to sit and settle in why I was out: I had taken him to 3 private doctors and the hospital 3 times before I called an out-of-town hospital.  I couldn’t believe that so many professionals didn’t know or wouldn’t say anything except that he had reflux.

Three days later he had his operation.

At the hospital

His op was done in 2005 at the children’s hospital of one of Australia’s capital cities, and they were amazing: the nurses were so good and knowing we had little support locally they went out of their way to be even more helpful..  We had the choice of the long slice under his ribs or the key holes: thankfully the surgeon agreed key hole was better.

When we were in the children’s hospital I saw a poster made about PS by one of the nurses or a med student.  I was shocked at the number of cases: 1/200 children are born with it, yet with it being seemingly so common, it was so hard to get it diagnosed.  It affects first born males more than other babies, and yes, it can be fatal.

Since his op

SL 2005-13bThis is what is left of the scars my little man has from his operation when he was 5 weeks old.  Now he’s nearly 9 years old.  He knows he’s lucky to have tiny, tiny scars, and being able to show him what scars others have from the same operation is very helpful.

My son chose these photos himself and is more than happy to let others know what happened.  so other mummies don’t have to be scared like I was.  He is doing really well.  It took a long time for him to put on weight, and even now he’s still very skinny, but he’s hit all his growth markers on time or earlier.  Just glad someone knew what was happening with him.

SL 2005-13aYes, it is so scary.  I had never heard of PS before he was diagnosed, yet after that I found out friends had had it when they were babies.

Time seems to fly once they are over it.  My son has 3 tiny tiny scars, not even 3 mm long: no stitches were required.  One scar is near his bellybutton, the other two are on the right side of his tummy, one up towards his ribs, and one in line with his bellybutton.  If you don’t know they are there you can’t see them.  He’s very lucky in that respect.

If I hadn’t pointed out his scars he wouldn’t know they were there, but I’ve always let him know what happened and how it was handled by the surgeon.  His little brother is upset because he doesn’t have scars too.  It’s quite cute as he knows he’s identical to his big brother in every other way.

My little one now has enough scars of his own, so he’s not too bad now, just cute when he got upset because his big brother had been sick and in hospital and he wasn’t here to look after him and make him feel better.  Not bad since there is a 4 year age gap.

My boys are my world, I know they will learn things on their own, I just need to guide them in the right directions.

Mother’s reflections

I was surprised to find out how common PS is, yet not one of the 3 doctors or dozen nurses we saw mentioned it.

Where I’m from we have lots of young mums, and I would hate to think how many of them get told the same as me, that I was just an over-anxious young mum; I was 22, but what about the younger teenagers who get told it and believe it, not getting their baby the help it needs?  We get given tons of leaflets telling us how to breast feed or which baby product is better, even why we should immunise, but nothing on pyloric stenosis.

Our run was far from easy, I had to fight doctors, nurses and midwives to finally get an answer.  My son has had it easy since his operation, so we are lucky in that aspect.

After what my son went through, a friend of a friend’s son had the same symptoms and she went with her friend to the doctor’s and talked about pyloric stenosis, so he was sent for an ultrasound; otherwise his mum would have been like me, worrying and not knowing.

My son thinks it’s cool that his scars are on the internet.  I checked with him before I put them up.  I explained to him that once the photos are up everyone can see them, and all the dangers of the internet.  (The little bugger hacked my wifi to download games, so he got the danger talk.)

But he likes that he can show his scars and see what other people’s are like.

Can pyloric stenosis be a mild case?

How long is a piece of string?  The variety of ways infant pyloric stenosis (“PS”) can raise its horrible head is like answering that hoary question.

Almost two years ago I posted an attempt to answer this question,  It is not only a post still well worth reading if you are asking yourself this question.  The post had several responses which underline how frustrating and kaleidoscopic it is to answer several of the questions about PS.  Let me run through the main parts to my answer again here.

Pyloric Stenosis or pylorospasm?

Whether there is a significant difference between Pyloric Stenosis and Pylorospasm has been argued at least since the early years of the 20th century and it is still debated in medical circles.  Those favouring the distinction describe Pylorospasm as a spasming of the pylorus triggered by the nerves and resulting in the delayed emptying of the stomach – but nothing much more .  It is agreed that true PS involves the thickening and hardening of the muscle band of the pyloric ring, and when advanced enough this would not let any food pass into the duodenum, usually with fatal results.

However, others have preferred to see Pylorospasm as the beginning or a milder form of PS.  There is a difference, but it may only be clear from an ultrasound study, as this article explains and illustrates.  Another useful article may be read (although only in summary) here.

From my simple and probably simplistic description it should be clear that Pylorospasm is not serious enough to warrant surgical and perhaps not even medical intervention, and that a full PS will be fatal unless there is some form of intervention.

Baby sick2 (Medium)To add to the confusion, PS is often termed “Pylorospasm”.  I well remember that in my native Netherlands the condition I had was called “pyloruspasmus” even though it was clearly a full-grade PS!  I find that the same confusing interchangeability continues in at least several different languages today.

The bottom line is: some misbehaviour of the pylorus is mild enough to not warrant surgery.  Not all projectile vomiting is deadly, so doctors will sometimes await further developments.  This is not to be confused with the fact that many doctors are accused of belittling parents, not taking time for careful diagnostic questions and tests, and brushing off parents with talk of reflux – all this when the baby has lost significant weight and condition, and even when the parents mention the family’s history of PS.

Many cases of PS do not go to the operating room

Google “I had” together with “pyloric stenosis” and you will find articles, forum comments and posts that support the above statement.

There are many mentions of babies with what was clearly PS and whose condition was responsibly judged not to be severe enough to justify surgery.  But these people in later life continued to battle with PS-like symptoms for many years – or lifelong.  Some eventually sought surgery (usually more major than an infant pyloromyotomy) and some did as best they could by managing their food intake and distressing symptoms.

Pyloric stenosis can continue to “grumble” whether or not there has been surgery

As I have stated many times, many doctors promise parents that a safe, simple and quick operation will solve all their baby’s PS problems and that there are most unlikely to be any after-effects.

Surgery can be very successful in treating PS but it can also lead to short-term or lifelong symptoms which seem to be similar to some extent to mild PS: reflux and IBS, sensitivity to gagging and vomiting, overweight or chronic under-weight, etc.

Mild PS which is not dealt with by surgery is sometimes not treated at all or is treated with medication such as Atropine sulphate or Ranitidine.  Either of these two courses may also lead to lifelong and troublesome gastric misbehaviour.

It seems beyond the ability of medical people to know whether a particular set of borderline or mixed symptoms should be diagnosed as PS, mild PS, pylorospasm, or something else.  It also seems to be impossible to predict the future course of any case of PS, whichever way it has been treated or not treated.

A thorough and substantial research project or two would be so valuable to obtain a clearer picture of the consequences of various levels and treatments of this rather common condition in babies.

Medication can treat many pyloric stenosis cases successfully

In most “Western” countries, the medical treatment of PS with Atropine sulphate or Ranitidine has usually been given no or scant consideration.

These two drugs relax muscles and allow the pylorus to relax, reducing its swelling and allowing it to open and shut without surgical intervention, but because of their effect on all muscles they must be introduced over several days and under careful medical supervision.  This course of treatment has been used for many years by pediatric specialists in many countries, and a recent Japanese project found its use succeeded in avoiding surgery in almost every case in the trial.

Parents who could or should consider medical treatment for their baby must 1) know the symptoms of PS well, 2) have gathered strong evidence of their baby’s condition and perhaps have had previous experience with this malady, 3) have a baby who is not close to death, and 4) are willing to learn how to use the medication.  They may also need a supportive person to stand by their side as they may need to insist on being heard and helped by their doctor.  It must be realised that the safe use of medication requires early diagnosis, a baby who is not frail or newborn, and a baby whose condition allows the several days necessary for the drug to take effect.

Interested parents should use the “Categories” search box to the right of this page to find and read posts like this one on “the hushed up alternative to PS surgery.

Pyloric stenosis hits new parents hard

Bear with me as I again reflect on the horrible pain parents endure when their newborn pride-and-joy –

  • becomes horribly unwell, unable to keep down any nourishment,
  • loses instead of gaining weight and condition,
  • causes them to find (as many do) that their usually trusty doctor n be terribly condescending and dismissive (“typically anxious  new parents,” and “try another formula”), only to be told by another voice in the medical machine, “I’m sorry but your baby is close to death, you should have brought him / her in much earlier… you’ll have to submit your baby for surgery.”

A few days ago my family marked the centenary of my father’s birth, and I dug up some of the 1945-vintage documents he left me, including (1) his receipt for paying somebody to announce my birth to the town notables, and (2) a short letter he wrote to his parents on the day after my birth.  Both are clear evidence of the extreme joy, excitement and pride my parents felt after many years of waiting to start a family.

Baby unhappy01What happened immediately after that has been wiped off the record: I have no documents, no letters and no stories about my pyloric stenosis (PS).  It must have been only a day or so after these carefully conserved sheets of paper were written that I started to throw back everything my frightened mother gave me.  Ten days after my birth their tiny frail baby was tied down on a large operating table in a nearby city hospital.

After many years I can well understand that my parents did all they could to delete the PS page of my story from their lives.  But their doing this did not help me to come to terms with my story, nor my understanding and managing the distress of PTSD that resulted.

What has helped me understand and accept my parents’ pain has been what others have written about the intensity of what they endured with their baby’s sudden and violent sickness followed by surgery.

One such account was written early in 2013 by a British father who like my father is a church pastor and who like my parents went through PS quite unexpectedly and with their first child, also a boy.  Under a powerful title, When your son goes under the knife – a dad’s experience, Roy Summers wrote –

Child under the knifeIt is one thing to be in hospital for a personal operation as an adult, but quite a different experience as a parent of a child.  As a general rule my family of six have enjoyed remarkably good health, for which we thank God.  We had an early scare with our firstborn, who had pyloric stenosis as a baby and was only a shade away from death; but apart from the normal scrapes of family life the Lord has granted good health.

Roy Summers then reflected on what he has learnt from a more recent experience, when another of his sons suffered a ruptured appendix and complications after the operation.  I recommend going to Roy Summers’ post and reading it in full, as I regard it as portraying a thoroughly human response to inner pain and beautifully integrated with Christian faith and pastoral care.  I would like to pass on the main headings to whet the reader’s interest in what Roy and his wife Yvonne learnt.

  • The last kiss?
  • Trust – placed Where?
  • Why was the first operation not “successful”?
  • How often and passionately do we pray the more important prayers?
  • Why didn’t God answer a little boy’s prayers?
  • Thank you for the medicine

Roy goes a long way beyond merely writing (as many such parents do), “This was the worst experience I have ever had!”  I am grateful to him for this.

parent-talking-to-childAlthough many of the details of this father’s experience and reflections are related to his son’s appendicitis and peritonitis operation and are therefore somewhat different from those he would have had when his first son had PS, the emotions, questions, Christian response and character-shaping issues are exactly the same.